Kolam: Computing and Cosmology within Indian Art (by Shivoham) – Part 2

  CONTINUED FROM PART 1 History of Kolam Creating paintings on a natural surface has a really ancient history in India, as evidenced by the Bhimbetka frescoes that are at least 15, 000 years old.  This news article [2] talks about the use of Rangoli in the Mahabharata, while another forum mentions the design in the Ramayana. Other floor designs, such as the endearing floor... Continue Reading →

Kolam: Computing and Cosmology within Indian Art (by Shivoham) – Part 1

  An attempt, a drawing half-done is the world's life; Its lines doubt their concealed significance, Its curves join not their high intended close. Yet some first image of greatness trembles there, And when the ambiguous crowded parts have met The many-toned unity to which they moved, The Artist's joy shall laugh at reason's rules;... Continue Reading →

The Organisational Cycle: From Reason to Subjectivity (Part 2)

CONTINUED FROM PART 1 Published in the February 2016 issue of Sraddha, Vol. 7 (3), pp. 128-146. Model-based Scientific Decision Making and its Limitations It is very typical of human reason to develop some kind of systematic model to represent the diverse set of variables present in the existing reality. We find examples of such... Continue Reading →

The Organisational Cycle: From Reason to Subjectivity (Part 1)

Published in the February 2016 issue of Sraddha, Vol. 7 (3), pp. 128-146. This paper is part of our ongoing research series, The Organisational Cycle. The series is based on our ongoing study of Sri Aurobindo’s social philosophy as presented in his work, The Human Cycle. It is an attempt to explore how some of the fundamental ideas presented in The... Continue Reading →

India, Indology and Deep Colonialism (by Subhodeep Mukhopadhyay -Conclusion)

READ PARTS 1, 2, 3 CONTINUED FROM PART 4     THE WAY FORWARD... Encourage Sanskrit Learning Sanskrit is the language of Indian culture and ethos. The day Sanskrit dies, Indian culture or Sanskriti will also die and Hindus or Indians as a unique people with unique set of values will cease to exist. Anti-Sanskrit forces... Continue Reading →

India, Indology and Deep Colonialism (by Subhodeep Mukhopadhyay -Part 4)

CONTINUED FROM PART 3 THE WAY FORWARD Now that we understand the landscape and the forces at work, how do we deal with this situation? Below I propose a 7-point agenda based on opinions of experts and scholars like Rajiv Malhotra, Sanjeev Sanyal, Chamu Shastri, Roddam Narasimha and others. Decolonize our National History History curriculum in... Continue Reading →

India, Indology and Deep Colonialism (by Subhodeep Mukhopadhyay -Part 3)

CONTINUED FROM PART 2     “The ideals that governed the spirit and body of Indian society were of the highest kind, its social order secured an inexpugnable basic stability, the strong life force that worked in it was creative of an extraordinary energy, richness and interest, and the life organised remarkable in its opulence, variety... Continue Reading →

India, Indology and Deep Colonialism (by Subhodeep Mukhopadhyay -Part 2)

CONTINUED FROM PART 1 Introductory Note from Matriwords In the text below, we have added a few relevant passages and quotes from Sri Aurobindo's and the Mother's writings to provide additional context as well as wider and deeper significance to the arguments presented by our guest writer, Subhodeep Mukhopadhyay. He has approved of these additions. For a larger discussion... Continue Reading →

India, Indology and Deep Colonialism (by Subhodeep Mukhopadhyay -Part 1)

INTRODUCTORY NOTE FROM MATRIWORDS Matriwords is happy to present this important 5-part series, written by Subhodeep Mukhopadhyay. I came to ‘know’ Subhodeep through Indiblogger and gradually became more familiar with his wide-ranging and deep intellectual, philosophic and spiritual pursuits every time I visited his blogs, The Advaitist and The Tiny Man. His well-reasoned and well-formulated... Continue Reading →

The Orgranisational Cycle: Age of Reasoning (Concluded)

This is the concluding part of the series. Continued from Part 5 Published in August 2015 issue of Sraddha, Vol. 7 (1), pp. 134-157. SHORTCOMINGS OF THE SCIENTIFIC MANAGEMENT, BEYOND THE AGE OF REASONING Major criticism of the scientific management was that it tended to make workers into robots or machines. Several social scientists referred to... Continue Reading →

The Organisational Cycle: Age of Reasoning (Part 5)

Continued from Part 4 Published in August 2015 issue of Sraddha, Vol. 7 (1), pp. 134-157. OUTCOME OF THE AGE OF REASON: THE SCIENTIFIC MANAGEMENT It was believed that the capabilities of science can not only transform the physical world but also the arena of management. Scientific management introduced a novel way of organizing labor... Continue Reading →

Dussehra Special: Rama, the Avatar of the Sattwic Mind (Book Excerpts from “The Thinking Indian”)

Dussehra, the day when Sri Rama became victorious over the Rakshasa named Ravana. The day when the Good conquered over the Evil. The day when Dharma won over Adharma. With time as more and more sections of humanity have made stupendous progress in the realm of mental development, along with which there is increasing emphasis on rationalism we are also witnessing greater... Continue Reading →

The Organisational Cycle: Age of Reasoning (Part 4)

Continued from Part 3 Published in August 2015 issue of Sraddha, Vol. 7 (1), pp. 134-157. SUPREME DESIDERATA The very nature of the age of reasoning is dependent upon individual enlightenment and discernment. Unrestrained use of personal judgment without any checks and standards could be dangerous and could lead to continual difference of opinion, perspective,... Continue Reading →

Book Review: The Thinking Indian

I am happy to share today a review of  "The Thinking Indian: Essays on Indian Socio-Cultural Matters in the Light of Sri Aurobindo"  written by Gilu Mishra, a friend and a fellow lover and student of Sri Aurobindo and the Mother. Gilu and I met several years ago in Pondicherry when she joined the institution where I... Continue Reading →

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